PAC-10 Football Ethics: Cal’s Jeff Tedford teaches cheating: his Cal Bears almost beat the Oregon Ducks

 

Cal’s football coaching staff has found a way to slow down the lightning speed of the Oregon Ducks: cheat. The Ducks are undefeated and ranked #1 in the nation, but they almost stumbled Saturday against the Cal Bears, holding on to win, 15-13. Cal’s secret weapon? Faking injuries to stop the game and give Cal players time to catch their breath and get ready for the Ducks’ next play.


Several times during the game Oregon’s offense was stopped as a Cal player went down with an apparent non-contact injury, then quickly returned to the game. The most egregious example was captured on YouTube. Cal head coach Jeff Tedford denied cheating, telling ESPN,


“People get hurt during games and in fast-tempo stuff, there’s cramps. That’s not the deal. I know that anytime anybody goes down against Oregon, they always think that’s the case. But it’s not the case.


However, The Oregonian reports that “a source within the Bears football program confirmed to The Oregonian that this [faking injuries] indeed was “a big part” of the defensive game plan against Oregon, although not all Cal coaches were on board with this strategy.”


The official NCAA football rulebook makes clear that faking an injury is cheating. Under the heading “Coaching Ethics,” page FR-13 states that:


feigning injury is dishonest, unsportsmanlike and contrary to the spirit of the rules. Such tactics cannot be tolerated among sportsmen of integrity.


Where does that tell about Jeff Tedford and the Cal Bears?

 

About these ads

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

One Response to “PAC-10 Football Ethics: Cal’s Jeff Tedford teaches cheating: his Cal Bears almost beat the Oregon Ducks”

  1. Cal Bears admit cheating against Oregon Ducks after incriminating video surfaces and Pac-10 announces investigation « Ethics Bob Says:

    [...] director Sandy Barbour for punishing Tosh Lupoi, the assistant coach who instructed a player to fake an injury to slow down the lightning-fast play of the Oregon [...]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 61 other followers

%d bloggers like this: